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Everywhere All The Time: A New Deschooling Reader

£10.00

5.0 average, based on 1 reviews

Manufacturer: AK Press

Product Information

Debates about education often revolve around standardized testing, taxes and funding, teacher certification - everything except how to best help kids develop learning skills. Everywhere All the Time presents an array of historical and contemporary alternatives to traditional schooling, demonstrating that children's capacity to learn decreases as soon as they enter bureaucratic, institutional facilities.

Trends indicate an increasing skepticism toward current public and private school models. They fail to offer kids the skills they need to be healthy, self-directed life-learners. They stifle creativity, and encourage conformity of thought. They utilize draconian disciplinary measures and a one-size-fits-all approach to learning. Government control of, and corporate intrusion into education has been a further disaster for communities concerned with the welfare of their youngsters. Alternatively, the "deschooling" project offers self-directed learning strategies for children, encourages community-building and participation from parents in the learning process, builds critical thinking for active engagement and democratic self-governance, and alleviates the negative psychological effects of traditional schooling methods.

Contributors include, among many others, Ivan Illich, Grace Llewellyn, John Taylor Gatto, Vinoba Bhave, Emma Goldman, Gustava Esteva, Madhu Prakash, Pat Farenga, the Pedro Abizu Puerto Rican High School and Albany Free School, as well as interviews with unschooled children and an array of international alternative-to-school experimenters in Israel, Thailand, India, and Mali.

Edited by Matt Hern, with an introduction by Ivan Illich. AK Press, 2008.

Product Code: 9781904859833

Customer Reviews

Average Rating: 5

Relief

In an era of manic target setting, centralised control over schools, increasing privatisation, rigid curriculums, morphing OFSTED regimes, obsessive testing and exhausting workloads a new reader on deschooling and libertarian education is just what is needed. This book collects a range of high quality perspectives on the topic and is perfect to inform the practice of all who have been victims and/or perpetrators of schooling at the expense of education. The only thing I would mention as a problem with some of the libertarian views on education is that they can undermine the fact that some people are more knowledgeable about the facts in certain topics than others. While people are of course entitled to their views on astro physics, if they don't know anything about it this makes their views less relevant than if they had learnt about it first. It’s a bit like being in an airplane and saying you disagree with the pilot on how to fly it without ever having learnt anything about flying planes. To reject this fact seems to incline towards a postmodern nihilism in which all views are equal when they are clearly not. Having said that though this isn't a problem at all with this book in particular, but is within the subject matter covered. All in this is a very high quality read and a great introduction to the subject. For further reading anything by Ivan Illich and Paolo Friere (though his work is less accessible) is highly recommended alongside the AK edition of Avrich’s ‘The Modern School Movement’.

A teacher :: May 23 2010, 13:06 PM

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